Discussion:
What Russia Has To Offer America
(too old to reply)
Oleg Smirnov
2019-07-09 05:01:57 UTC
Permalink
I am delighted that
the president of America and the president of Russia are friends.
They are not.
Probably the most important one is family. A former Reagan administration
official once told me that Russians have much to teach Americans about
family. In Russia, marriages tend to stay together even if they are
troubled. Whereas in America many men skip out on their families and many
women divorce for trivial or capricious reasons.
These same women howl abuse about the tiniest things that happen to them
while supporting vicious abuses by Muslim or inner-city men as well as
abuses against women nicer and prettier than themselves. Russian women stand
to put things into perspective, both for these women and for many others.
Oh boy ..

These simple Western beliefs have little to do with reality. Russian
marriages divorce more often than the couples in the US. In most cases,
women initiate divorce, - and this fact is neither Russia nor US-specific.

The fact the Russians aren't enthusiastic about 'progressive' perversions
and the fact they recognize men's and women's 'natural born' difference
and peculiarity isn't equal to what the American rightards / conservatives
associate with 'family values' or what the American leftards / feminists
associate with 'patriarchal' theme.

Russia is persistently keeping the N1 position in Women in Business world
rating <http://bit.ly/2XyFGaL>, which is based on calculation of women
percentage in senior business management. In this respect, Russia shares
the company with the northeast European and Caucasus (of Christian
cultural background) countries <http://bit.ly/2G3MNC2>. It indicates a
regional gender culture pattern that notably differs from 'western' gender
culture as well as from the myths the Westerners used to cultivate.
Oleg Smirnov
2019-07-14 12:47:11 UTC
Permalink
My interest is in Khruschev. I seem to have
conflicting information about him. Recently
I search'd online to refresh my memory,
which, honestly, I know little about him at
all, and wanted to know, actually, my search
was 'was he a killer' where 'was he a 'monster'
might have been more like what I was look'n
for. I don't recall ever hearing he was. Not
to the degree that Uncle Sam, Chairman Mao,
Pol Pot and such committed crimes against
humanity.
Oftentimes they're both. But some things I've
read about him, and from him, and having
to take every damn thing the bastards in
the U.S. Church And Fuck'n State have
ever told me 'with a grain of salt'.
Anything to tell me about Khruschev?
I've caught some rather intriguing
about him.
In essence, Khruschev had significantly changed the late Stalin's
Soviet policies towards more egalitarian track. For example, Stalin
had built those 'Moscow skyscrapers' <http://bit.ly/2JIyYdc>. Those
constructions were very expensive - while a large part of the Soviet
people outside of the capital cities, and even within them, were
living in pretty poor conditions at that post-WW2 period. Khruschev
started mass housing construction program for urban areas that gave
to many people modestly comfortable separate apartments with all due
utilities. One more 'mass' thing was the gasification of households,
so that even today it's possible to find those old simple gas stoves
that continue working well since the 1950-60s.

Khruschev had made high education more affordable to everyone in the
Soviet Union. Before 1956, the Soviet students had to pay for high
education, and even the higher middle school (for the last 8 to 10
grades) was non-free. The tuition fee wasn't much high, but it still
made education for poor strata impossible, - Khruschev abolished it.

Khruschev was himself an all-around product of the preceding Stalin's
system, while his counter-Stalinist effort was to make the USSR less
'cultist autocracy' but more 'principledly communistic'. As a person,
he was very er.. immediate, sometimes rude, but not much 'formidable'.
He made mistakes and reckless decisions, there were excesses. For
example, he created the Crimea 'time bomb' when decided to hand over
Crimea to the Ukraine. (Many say Khruschev was Ukrainian, but it's not
quite true - he was born and grew in the area where 'Russian' and
'Ukrainian' simply aren't much distinguishable.) Within his
strict 'principledly communistic' agenda he intensified suppression of
'petty-bourgeois' rural economic activities, and such policies [once
again] did harm the agricultural production. Following the aspiration
to make the Soviet economy more people-oriented, Khruschev pursued a
reform for decentralization of economic management, - but the concept
of the reform included inner contradictions, so it was not succesful.
Moreover, this reform made the Soviet top central management people
angry, - so they eventually deprived Khruschev of the post of leader.

Among the Soviet and post-Soviet emigres in the US who love to educate
the Americans about the USSR - and for some of whom making a catching
story is important for their income - there are people from different
groups which might be differently affected by the Khruschev's policies.
So their focus and narratives may differ and look mutually conflicting.
Khruschev's own great-granddaughter is known in the US as 'professor
of international affairs', she writes spiteful anti-Russian articles.

If you're interested is something specific, I'll tell what I know.
Oleg Smirnov
2019-07-15 04:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oleg Smirnov
My interest is in Khruschev. I seem to have
conflicting information about him. Recently
I search'd online to refresh my memory,
which, honestly, I know little about him at
all, and wanted to know, actually, my search
was 'was he a killer' where 'was he a 'monster'
might have been more like what I was look'n
for. I don't recall ever hearing he was. Not
to the degree that Uncle Sam, Chairman Mao,
Pol Pot and such committed crimes against
humanity.
Oftentimes they're both. But some things I've
read about him, and from him, and having
to take every damn thing the bastards in
the U.S. Church And Fuck'n State have
ever told me 'with a grain of salt'.
Anything to tell me about Khruschev?
I've caught some rather intriguing
about him.
In essence, Khruschev had significantly changed the late Stalin's
Soviet policies towards more egalitarian track. For example, Stalin
had built those 'Moscow skyscrapers' <http://bit.ly/2JIyYdc>. Those
constructions were very expensive - while a large part of the Soviet
people outside of the capital cities, and even within them, were
living in pretty poor conditions at that post-WW2 period. Khruschev
started mass housing construction program for urban areas that gave
to many people modestly comfortable separate apartments with all due
utilities. One more 'mass' thing was the gasification of households,
so that even today it's possible to find those old simple gas stoves
that continue working well since the 1950-60s.
Khruschev had made high education more affordable to everyone in the
Soviet Union. Before 1956, the Soviet students had to pay for high
education, and even the higher middle school (for the last 8 to 10
grades) was non-free. The tuition fee wasn't much high, but it still
made education for poor strata impossible, - Khruschev abolished it.
Khruschev was himself an all-around product of the preceding Stalin's
system, while his counter-Stalinist effort was to make the USSR less
'cultist autocracy' but more 'principledly communistic'. As a person,
he was very er.. immediate, sometimes rude, but not much 'formidable'.
He made mistakes and reckless decisions, there were excesses. For
example, he created the Crimea 'time bomb' when decided to hand over
Crimea to the Ukraine. (Many say Khruschev was Ukrainian, but it's not
quite true - he was born and grew in the area where 'Russian' and
'Ukrainian' simply aren't much distinguishable.) Within his
strict 'principledly communistic' agenda he intensified suppression of
'petty-bourgeois' rural economic activities, and such policies [once
again] did harm the agricultural production. Following the aspiration
to make the Soviet economy more people-oriented, Khruschev pursued a
reform for decentralization of economic management, - but the concept
of the reform included inner contradictions, so it was not succesful.
Moreover, this reform made the Soviet top central management people
angry, - so they eventually deprived Khruschev of the post of leader.
Among the Soviet and post-Soviet emigres in the US who love to educate
the Americans about the USSR - and for some of whom making a catching
story is important for their income - there are people from different
groups which might be differently affected by the Khruschev's policies.
So their focus and narratives may differ and look mutually conflicting.
Khruschev's own great-granddaughter is known in the US as 'professor
of international affairs', she writes spiteful anti-Russian articles.
If you're interested is something specific, I'll tell what I know.
I was very impressed with the way Khruschev exposed Eisenhower's lie to
the world about Operation Overflight. In 'Khruschev Remembers'
I didn't find him to be such a bad sort at all. Reasonable even. Btw, I
am still implacably disgusted with Eisenhower and think him as evil or
worse than the Khruschev I learned about from a Pencostalist pulpit
as a kid. The same pulpit that put forth that the Kennedy assignation was
a good thing for America, because he was Catholic. If that doesn't tell
a nine year old that kill'n, break'n the laws of "GOD" and man, is ok, if
your cause is right...
And recently in researching Bác H?, I found where Khruschev had made a
rather unusual comment about him being the closest to being like
one of the early (Christian) apostles, more than anyone he'd ever met.
He seems to have said it as a commendation and has me wondering just
what his beliefs concerning Judaism/Christian bullshit actually were.
No doubt he was acquainted with the subject. I was taught that he,
Khruschev, was a devil incarnate, an atheist, a communist. I would
really like to have the most thorough and honest picture of the man
He really was a communist/atheist, and the anti-religious campaign
really happened. There was a heavy anti-religious campaigning in
the Soviet press and other media. The laws regulating activities of
religious organizations had been tightened significantly. There were
people convicted for not complying with these harsh laws. The number
of such convicts in the USSR at the time is estimated in between 1
and 2 thousand, and the typical punishment was 1-3 years in jail.

It all should be understood in the broader context. The people that
made the Russia's 1917 revolt were harshly hostile to religion from
the very beginning. Religion was considered a reactionary thing that
promotes superstitions and supports social injustice. The greatest
persecution of believers in the USSR happened before the WW2.

During the WW2, Stalin changed anti-religious policies. It happened
not because he somehow changed his mind, but because the Nazis began
to revive religious communities in the occupied territory and it was
seen that the local believers approve such a revival. Stalin sought
to undermine the Nazis' ability to use the church theme as a tool for
promotion of anti-Soviet sentiment, that's why the policies against
religion were significantly softened. When the Red Army started
taking the occupied territories back, the religious communities were
not persecuted.

The Khruschev's anti-religious pressure was an integral part of his
"back to the true Lenin's principles" agenda. It may be well seen as
a repression campaign. However, in contrast to the pre-WW2 time, the
pressure was implemented not through terror and terror-like practice
but through tightening restrictive laws and mass propaganda.
Even if other stuff I have recently found of his 'crimes' in the
Ukraine is true, I still suspect him at this point of having had
a much better character than any U.S. presidents excepting perhaps
Buchanan and Carter, with whom he seems to have been more akin.
Certainly no Americans supporting the bastards in Washington
can take the moral high ground over any communists in history,
nor any other country, or people.
No American supporting the 'system' aka 'the racket' aka The U.S. Dept.
Of Trafficking can take the moral high ground over anybody anywhere
either.
Yes, I would like to understand more about his character, religious
beliefs if any. I don't recall his ever giving away his religious
beliefs in anything I've read.
Well, I said above, Khruschev was himself a product of the preceding
system. When he held positions in the Stalin's state apparatus he of
course had to follow the party line and pursue those policies that
Khruschev himself later branded as horrific and criminal. So it's the
case where you can hardly see a pure good and pure evil.

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